Every Gamer Should Read: League of Legends: Realms of Runeterra (2019)

For hard-core fans, the beauty lies in the details.

Realms-of-Runeterra

Riot Games

You can’t spend 24 hours a day lobbing incendiary grenades at terrorists in CS:GO or waiting in vain for Fortnite’s long-delayed Season 3 to finally start. You’ve got to sleep, for one thing, not to mention eat—and no, chasing a fistful of Flintstones Gummies with a can of Monster Assault does not count as a meal. Reading is optional, of course, but if you can tear your eyes away from the screen for a few minutes, you’ll find that there are some pretty great books out there that even the most die-hard gamer can appreciate, covering topics from the history of video games to the bleeding edge of ESports.

This week’s pick:

League of Legends: Realms of Runeterra by Riot Games

LoL-Realms-of-Runeterra
A two-page spread from League of Legends: Realms of Runeterra.

For hard-core fans, the beauty of League of Legends: Realms of Runeterra lies in the details.

So, as gorgeously illustrated as this hardcover guide is, the major drawing card is the stories within. And those stories go deeper than pulling back the curtain on the Avarosan warmother known as Ashe.

Get ready for a cavalcade of obscure trivia that will shed new light on the 11 wildly varied regions of Runeterra, including Demacia, Piltover, Shurima, and the fantastically named Bilgewater.

Like, for example, the time a seemingly not-up-to-the-job ancient tea-house proprietor kicked butt all over Ionia, making the world just a little safer.

Or how Piltover became a forward-thinking epicentre by placing a premium on art and craftsmanship rather than military strength.

In addition to stories, you get those stunningly rendered illos, history lessons on various conflicts, and breakdowns on who’s allied with whom behind the scenes and why.

Yes, League of Legends: Realms of Runeterra doesn’t bill itself as “encyclopedic” for nothing.

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Mike Usinger once took the better part of two years to finish Grand Theft Auto. Over the course of his career he has written about everything from eSports to music to movies to travel.

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