HP expands its reach into the world of esports with HyperX purchase

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Hewlett-Packard has just taken another major step towards solidifying itself as a company deeply dialed into the world of esports. The company has roots that date back to the earlier personal computers in the ’50s and ’60s. Today, however, it recognizes the value of headsets and cutting-edge gaming equipment. Consider the fact that HP owns OMEN. It makes sense then that HP has bought HyperX.

A blue-chip company, HyperX has been in the news recently. Last week, for example, the company entered into a groundbreaking partnership with WNBA basketball champion Aerial Powers. But HyperX’s roots in tech are deep ones that date back to 2002.

Back then HyperX and its parent company Kingston started to establish itself as a company making high-performance memory modules. At the start of last decade, it began branching out into esports through gaming accessories like mice, keyboards, and headsets.

HP is also anything but a newbie to the world of esports. As much as the company is seen as famously conservative—especially when compared to operations like Apple—it’s long had the OMEN brand of accessories under its umbrella.

HP’s OMEN offerings are popular

Popular offerings include the OMEN 15 gaming laptop and the HP Pavilion Gaming 16 laptop. There’s also an OMEN Gaming Hub, which operates as a platform for players to connect and customize, their gear and games.

Kingston CEO John Tu said the news that HP has bought HyperX will ensure future growth.

“HyperX products are designed to meet the most rigorous demands of all gamers–from casual to the most hardcore–giving them a winning edge and helping them stay on top of their game,” he said in a news release. “Both of our companies thrive because we focus on our employees and share the same core values and culture. David Sun (Co-founder and COO) and I saw the possibilities for the HyperX business and its employees and we both realized that this change brings a brighter future for HyperX.”

Mike Usinger once took the better part of two years to finish Grand Theft Auto. Over the course of his career he has written about everything from eSports to music to movies to travel.

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